Material Connection

September 1, 2021 | Tom Bassett-Dilley

One of the advantages of working closely with my friend and builder, Eric Barton (Biltmore Homes), on my own home renovation is the chance to literally get my hands on all the materials we’re using, and to discuss material techniques and strategies as we go. It’s not the textbook approach where the builder reads the plans and specs and installs exactly what the architect said; it’s the architect and builder looking at the crawlspace ceiling, scratching our heads, and asking, “how can we do this without spray foam?” That sort of thing.

During the August 25th Green Built Home Tour, I described the moment I had when we removed the gas line from our house as part of this project. I no longer had a pipe coming into the house with a gas that could catch on fire, kill me with carbon monoxide, and poison my family every time I cooked. Having it gone was surprisingly visceral. I’m getting the same with the materials.

What really struck me over the weekend while I was painting trim and installing foundation insulation was the emotional connection to material. When you cut wood trim, you get sawdust. Don’t breathe it in, but it has a nice wood smell; cut cement fiber board trim, and you should be afraid—you should fear the silicates that you really shouldn’t breathe in. Cutting wood fiberboard insulation, you make compost; it’s totally different from cutting EPS (Styrofoam), with horrible white plastic pellets littering the jobsite, impossible to contain. The list goes on and on, but the upshot is that we can and should build durable, beautiful buildings from non-toxic materials. Some are harder to get than others, but aside from current supply chain issues, they’re getting more available as the design and construction industry demand them. So keep demanding!

Another recent experience we had on a project was an attic spray foam job that continued to smell days after installation. If the spray doesn’t cure properly due to the mix or the temperature, the uncured or still curing material can smell bad and contain some toxicity. Also, according to an experienced foam installer I know, apparently supply chain issues in the chemical manufacturing of the foam components has resulted in some bad batches.

It seems that from the late 19th century to now, we have created and deployed so many toxic materials—lead, asbestos, PFAS, vinyl, benzene and other various petroleum by-products, coal ash with its heavy metals, microplastics… while right in front of us we have wood, cellulose, stone, adhesives without added formaldehyde, solar and wind power, and so on. Check out our resource document for products, documents, websites, and more.

A guiding quote by Frank Lloyd Wright: “Study Nature, love Nature, stay close to Nature. It will never fail you.” We don’t always have all the information we need on every material we get our hands on, but I will always be looking for those feel-good materials as close to Nature as possible. 

Eric Barton installing salvaged corrugated siding over Steico fiberboard
Tom Bassett-Dilley Architects | Contact